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PiedPiperCoin

$2.51 USD

Market Cap: $3,388,500

Volume: $1,174,680

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Who Is Pied Piper?

Who is Pied Piper? Good question! That would be the intrepid folks whose bios are featured on this site and are currently building out our platform for launch at CES. Do we employ a pleasant-seeming young woman of Asian descent, who apparently plays the guitar? Sadly no, though I hope to change that soon when we expand our team, including the guitar-playing part: It would be nice to hear some music around here besides Gilfoyle’s terrifying noise that sounds like angry men raping each other with guitars. Something from Sarah McLachlan’s Surfacing album for me, please! 

This is by way of saying that some may have been a mite perplexed by the “I AM PIED PIPER” billboards—featuring said guitar-strumming woman—that recently went up on the 101 freeway and at other scattered locations in the greater Palo Alto area. These are the brainchild of our new investor Russ Hanneman, who believes they will promote our brand awareness. So for those who saw them, misunderstood and left us voicemails: We are a cloud-based compression company, and are ***not*** in the business of 1) selling guitars, 2) guitar lessons or 3) human trafficking.

I hope that clears things up! Jared out!

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  1. Yeah I play guitar…acoustic or electric….everything from A to Z. I can also sing everything from A to Z exactly like the album while I play guitar…don’t believe me? Check out my SPYDER-X Youtube channel. So if you want quality sounding guitar playing…along with an idea man that makes things happen…with never ending beautiful genius ideas that continually flow out…that will make your company build and grow…tell your investor, Russ Hanneman to buy me a GIBSON Les Paul Custom Deluxe guitar and 100 WATT MARSHALL STACK amplifier…and I will play your Sarah McLachlan Surfacing…like the back of my hand…and sing it too…I’m that good.

  2. How come her fingernails aren’t painted green to match the logo? Hanneman’s lack of attention to details?

  3. This is the most hostile and aggressive act of provocation I’ve ever had to endure. It crosses every line of decency. THIS IS WAR!

  4. I just applied for a job you Asshats, if you don’t hire me I’ll hack your software with a Bitcoin Mining Trojan. Peace out bitches.

  5. Who is Pied Piper?Good question! That would be the intrepid folks whose bios are featured on this site and are currently building out our platform for launch at CES. Do we employ a pleasant-seeming young woman of Asian descent, who apparently plays the guitar? Sadly no, though I hope to change that soon when we expand our team, including the guitar-playing part: It would be nice to hear some music around here besides Gilfoyle’s terrifying noise that sounds like angry men raping each other with guitars. Something from Sarah McLachlan’s Surfacing album for me, please!
    谁是花笛手?这是个好问题!他们是本站上一群无畏的勇士,他们将建好我们的平台并在CES展会上进行发布。(此处应有伏笔?)我们是否雇佣了一位好看的年轻亚裔女士,弹吉他的那个?很可惜并没有,虽然我希望我们马上招兵买马了就可以有(网站上有招聘启事的文章,一本正经)。包括吉他部分也应该有——什么音乐都比吉尔弗约尔那可怕的噪音好听,那玩意听起来就像愤怒的男人用吉他互相强暴。请给我一些莎拉麦克劳伦专辑的音乐听好嘛!

    This is by way of saying that some may have been a mite perplexed by the “I AM PIED PIPER” billboards—featuring said guitar-strumming woman—that recently went up on the 101 freeway and at other scattered locations in the greater Palo Alto area. These are the brainchild of our new investor Russ Hanneman, who believes they will promote our brand awareness. So for those who saw them, misunderstood and left us voicemails: We are a cloud-based compression company, and are not in the business of 1) selling guitars, 2) guitar lessons or 3) human trafficking.
    顺便解释一下我们“我是花笛手”广告可能带来的困惑——就这个女的弹吉他的广告——这些广告牌现在从101高速到大帕罗奥托地区都有。这是我们新投资人拉丝汉尼曼搞的,谁能相信他居然提高了我们的品牌意识!所以要和那些看到后误解并留下语音邮件的人说一下:我们是一个基于云服务的压缩公司,我们-不-是-下面任何一种生意
    1)卖吉他2)教吉他3)人口贩子(喂,歧视哟!)

    I hope that clears things up! Jared out!
    希望都说清楚啦!走了~

  6. Why promote the show to people who are already fans and get the joke? "March" would be a better idea, HBO. Who the fuck asked me? LOVE the show!

Problem 1:

Single Points of Failure

Libraries are vulnerable to losing their collection because all of their books are contained at a single location. Say, for instance, that there was a fire, or a flood, or a vandal defaced John James Audubon’s masterpiece Birds of America by giving all the Warblers human genitalia. Even worse, if the vandal recruited bird haters from other neighborhoods and got ahold of all the copies of the book in existence, it could be lost crude doodles forever. It would be a tragedy on par with the destruction of the Library of Alexandria.

The Problem

Because Birds of America is centralized in one public location, it’s susceptible to permanent deletion. The same goes for content on the Internet — storing all your family photos on a single account in a cloud service? They could all be wiped away if someone hacked your account or corrupted the host servers.

The Solution

Our solution: In our decentralized library, we would duplicate and distribute multiple copies of Birds of America to your neighbors — if you need a copy, you would just go to your neighbor’s house. As our Pipernet town of mobile devices grows, so do the number of neighbors who might have a copy of your book. And the more potential copies there are available, the more secure the book is.

That’s what our new internet will allow you to do too: spread your personal files on devices across the world, so they’re completely safe from bad actors manipulating or deleting them.

Takeaways

All copies of your files in a well-known, hackable location = RISKY!

Files copied and distributed to multiple locations = SAFE!

Problem 2:

No Privacy

In order to check out books, you must have a library card — an ID that links back to your real world identity. That library card reveals all the books you’ve ever checked out, where you returned them, and whether they were returned on time.

The Problem

The tech titans collect data profiles on us too, and theirs are far more comprehensive. They amass thousands of personal data points by tracking our activities in both the online and physical worlds.

Users don’t own or control their own data, so it can be used against them. Take, for instance, Richard’s lawyer Pete Monahan, who had his probation revoked when the state retrieved his library records. Which was… probably a good idea. But for this metaphor’s purposes: bad that they can access that information!

On the web, our data profile is far more detailed, the laws around privacy even looser, and more freedoms are at stake. For example, what if Hooli sold your search data to an insurance company who then denied you coverage because you’ve HooliSearch-ed “kindest Palo Alto based Cardiologist” a few too many times?

The Solution

Replace library cards with anonymous identification cards which are impossible to connect to your real world identity. Instead of using a library card (linked to your name, address, etc.) to check out books, you would swipe a nondescript card (containing no personal details). Your activity would be tracked to keep the system stable, but your identity would not be siphoned and sold. I, for example, would no longer check out books as "Donald Dunn," but rather the nom de guerre "h3w0vbk37vpm."

That’s what our new internet will allow you to do too: use its apps and services without compromising your privacy.

Takeaways

Trading your identity and data for online services = RISKY!

Using services anonymously so nobody can target you = SAFE!

Problem 3:

Censorship and Manipulation

Because a town’s library is run by a small group of administrators, they could theoretically decide what books are available to its people. They could even decide to ban Birds of America, depriving young birders of Audubon’s elegant illustrations, pored over page by page under a government-issued blanket after lights out, giving you hope that even a slender-framed, shivering boy could grow to be as majestic as a Hooded Merganser.

The Problem

On the internet, multinational corporations can screen content, or even “adapt” their services to fit the local government’s requests. In both libraries and on the Web, we’re susceptible to data being censored or manipulated by intermediaries.

The Solution

A peer-to-peer lending system backed up by a fully public ledger, allowing you to send and receive books freely to anybody in the world without worrying about censorship or interference. Want to add Catcher in the Rye, Fahrenheit 451, or your controversial essay on Audubon’s coloring techniques? No problem, even if the town surrounded you with pitchforks to ban them, these vital texts would be available to share neighbor to neighbor, impossible to delete.

That’s what our new internet will allow you to do too: exchange messages and files directly with their intended receiver, disperse ideas and information free from threats of censorship.

Takeaways

Pushing all transactions through a central authority = OPPRESSIVE!

Establishing a peer to peer exchange system based on an immutable public ledger = FREE!

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